In The News

Sep 28, 2011

ABC News: Getting Big Pharma to Treat Childhood Cancers

At age five, some kids have won pee-wee sports championships or perhaps a class spelling bee, but for Luke Fochtman of Okemos, Mich., his fifth birthday marked his victory over a much larger foe -- in a life-or-death battle with childhood cancer, Luke has come out on top. "Through 72 weeks of treatment, chemotherapy, 105 fevers, he never said 'no' to us," says Luke's mom Monica Fochtman, 36. "That to me was very inspiring and humbling. To be in the presence of that kind of grace gave me the courage to keep going," she says. Though Luke's type of...

Sep 27, 2011

FOX News: Lobbyists Take to Capitol Hill for Childhood Cancer

WASHINGTON - 8-year-old Ryan Darby marched right up on a stage in the Capitol Visitor's Center, stood on a ladder and talked about his dream. "Maybe one day, every kid that gets diagnosed with leukemia will beat it, like me." Ryan has beaten leukemia, but one in five kids with cancer do not survive. "There are 13,500 children that are diagnosed with cancer each year. That sounds like a lot, but actually there are a lot of different types of childrens' cancer, so when you start to break it down, individual types of cancer are so rare that there is not a lot of...

Sep 23, 2011

Austin American-Statesman: Hope for children with cancer

Imagine your child fighting for his life, taking massive doses of highly toxic radiation and chemotherapy to kill the cancer in his body before it kills him. After years of pain and uncertainty, he beats the disease, only to find out that he will likely develop serious medical conditions related to the treatment that saved him. Though survival rates are up for some types of pediatric cancer, for more than half of those who beat the odds and proudly call themselves "survivors," the fight is not over. Three out of five are later afflicted with life-altering and life-threatening...

Sep 22, 2011

Houston Chronicle: Creating hope for children with rare diseases

Imagine your child fighting for his life, taking massive doses of highly toxic radiation and chemotherapy to kill the cancer in his body before it kills him. After years of pain and uncertainty, he beats the disease, only to find out that he will likely develop serious medical conditions related to the treatment that saved him. While survival rates are up for some types of pediatric cancer, for more than half who beat the odds and proudly call themselves survivors, the fight is not over. Three out of five are later afflicted with life-altering and life-threatening conditions as a result of...

Sep 22, 2011

Philadelphia Inquirer: Funding next generation of cancer cures

For a parent, there is perhaps no greater fear than that of losing a child, and a childhood cancer diagnosis has the greatest potential to make that possibility a reality. As a pediatric oncologist who has cared for children with cancer and their families for more than two decades, I know that only a parent who has confronted childhood cancer truly understands the depth of this fear, which touches the core of who we are as parents. In the 1960s, a diagnosis of the most common form of childhood cancer, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, meant almost certain death, with less than a 10 percent...

Sep 22, 2011

My FOX NY: Pediatric Cancer: David and Max Plotkin

MYFOXNY.COM - David and Max Plotkin are looking for a cure... for pediatric cancer, that is. Max was diagnosed with a rare form of cancer when he was four years old. Today, Max has been cancer-free for more than two years. David -- who left a lucrative career in finance to focus on his son's recovery-- has created the Max Cure Foundation.

Sep 16, 2010

The Hill: Pediatric cancer research remains woefully underfunded

Six-year-old Max Plotkin was having trouble reading. Although his fellow students were moving on to chapter books, Max was barely able to get through Green Eggs and Ham. His father, David, suspected Max only read certain sentences because he had memorized them and merely recited them. Naturally, Max, who less than two years earlier had scored in the 99th percentile in a kindergarten entrance aptitude test, began to detest reading. He recognized the growing gap between him and his peers, and as happens with many students who fall behind, Max started to feel self-conscious. David and...

Sep 15, 2010

Houston Chronicle: Medical summit to focus on pediatric cancer fight

Six-year-old Max Plotkin was having trouble reading. Although his fellow students were moving on to chapter books, Max was barely able to get through Green Eggs and Ham. His father, David, suspected Max only read certain sentences because he had memorized them and merely recited them. Naturally, Max, who less than two years earlier had scored in the 99th percentile in a kindergarten entrance aptitude test, began to detest reading. He recognized the growing gap between him and his peers and as happens with many students who fall behind, Max started to feel self-conscious. David and his wife...

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